Making Money Anything You Want It To Be

Dear Reader,

I wanted to share with you my full financial story so you could learn from my mistakes and also put into action some of my accomplishments.

Money Is One Form Of Power

But what is more powerful is financial education. Money comes and goes, but if you have the education about how money works, you gain power over it and can begin building wealth. The reason positive thinking alone does not work is that most people went to school and never learned how money works, so they spend their lives working for money.

Because I was only nine years old when I started, the lessons my rich dad taught me were simple. And when it was all said and done, there were only six main lessons, repeated over 30 years.

To back up, it’s important to understand that I had two fathers, a rich one and a poor one. One was highly educated and intelligent. He had a Ph.D. and completed four years of undergraduate work in less than two years. He then went on to Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and Northwestern University to do his advanced studies, all on full financial scholarships. My other father never finished the eighth grade.

Both men were successful in their careers, working hard all their lives.

Both earned substantial incomes.

Yet one always struggled financially. The other would become one of the richest men in Hawaii. One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities, and his church. The other left bills to be paid.

Both men were strong, charismatic, and influential.

Both men offered me advice, but they did not advise the same things.

Both men believed strongly in education but did not recommend the same course of study.

If I had only one dad, I would have had to accept or reject his advice. Having two dads offered me the choice of contrasting points of view: one of a rich man and one of a poor man.

Instead of simply accepting or rejecting one or the other, I found myself thinking more, comparing, and then choosing for myself. The problem was that the rich man was not rich yet, and the poor man was not yet poor. Both were just starting out on their careers, and both were struggling with money and families. But they had very different points of view about money.

For example, one dad would say, “The love of money is the root of all evil.” The other said, “The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

As a young boy, having two strong fathers influencing me was difficult. I wanted to be a good son and listen, but the two fathers did not say the same things. The contrast in their points of view, particularly about money, was so extreme that I grew curious and intrigued. I began to start thinking for long periods of time about what each was saying.

Much of my private time was spent reflecting, asking myself questions such as, “Why does he say that?” and then asking the same question of the other dad’s statement. It would have been much easier to simply say, “Yeah, he’s right. I agree with that.” Or to simply reject the point of view by saying, “The old man doesn’t know what he’s talking about.” Instead, having two dads whom I loved forced me to think and ultimately choose a way of thinking for myself. As a process, choosing for myself turned out to be much more valuable in the long run than simply accepting or rejecting a single point of view.

Yet one always struggled financially. The other would become one of the richest men in Hawaii. One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities, and his church. The other left bills to be paid.

Both men were strong, charismatic, and influential.

Both men offered me advice, but they did not advise the same things.

Both men believed strongly in education but did not recommend the same course of study.

If I had only one dad, I would have had to accept or reject his advice. Having two dads offered me the choice of contrasting points of view: one of a rich man and one of a poor man.

Instead of simply accepting or rejecting one or the other, I found myself thinking more, comparing, and then choosing for myself. The problem was that the rich man was not rich yet, and the poor man was not yet poor. Both were just starting out on their careers, and both were struggling with money and families. But they had very different points of view about money.

For example, one dad would say, “The love of money is the root of all evil.” The other said, “The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

As a young boy, having two strong fathers influencing me was difficult. I wanted to be a good son and listen, but the two fathers did not say the same things. The contrast in their points of view, particularly about money, was so extreme that I grew curious and intrigued. I began to start thinking for long periods of time about what each was saying.

Much of my private time was spent reflecting, asking myself questions such as, “Why does he say that?” and then asking the same question of the other dad’s statement. It would have been much easier to simply say, “Yeah, he’s right. I agree with that.” Or to simply reject the point of view by saying, “The old man doesn’t know what he’s talking about.” Instead, having two dads whom I loved forced me to think and ultimately choose a way of thinking for myself. As a process, choosing for myself turned out to be much more valuable in the long run than simply accepting or rejecting a single point of view.

The Beginning Of My Financial Life Story

The year was 1956. I was nine years old. In partnership with my best friend, Mike, we created my first successful business—my comic book business. As a young man, I worked in my rich dad’s convenience store—the early version of the 7-Eleven convenience stores. It was a little neighborhood grocery store where people bought items such as milk, bread, butter, and cigarettes. I didn’t like the work, but I did get free comic books out of it, so that was a plus. Rich dad’s son, Mike, also worked with me. We noticed that when the comic book distributor came with a new batch of comics, the store manager would cut the covers in half and give them to the distributor for credit.

Mike and I got the bright idea to ask if we could have the old comics. Because we worked at the store, he said yes as long as we didn’t sell them. Keeping true to our word, Mike and I started a comic book library in his basement. We charged other kids $0.10 a day to come read as many comic books as they wanted. Eventually, we were making $9.40 a week, which was a lot more than the $0.30 we were making at the store.

In other words, I took comic books that were going to be thrown away and created an asset around them.

This was when I learned the first rule to becoming rich: You must know the difference between an asset and a liability, and buy assets.

For the next nine years, until I left for four years of college in New York, followed by five years of service with the Marine Corps, I learned as much as I could from my rich dad. I spent countless hours following him around and listening to and learning from his business dealings.

Rich dad often said, “Money will be anything you want it to be.”

What he meant was that money comes from our minds, our thoughts. If a person says, “Money is hard to get,” it will probably be hard to get. If a person says, “Oh, I’ll never be rich,” or “It’s really hard to get rich,” it will probably be true for that person. If a person says, “The only way to get rich is to work hard,” then that person will probably work hard. If the person says, “If I had a lot of money, I would put it in the bank because I wouldn’t know what to do with it,” then it will probably happen just that way. You’d be surprised how many people think and do just that. And if a person says, “Investing is risky,” then it is. As rich dad said, “Money will be anything you want it to be.”

He explained that once a person stops searching for information and self-knowledge, ignorance sets in. That struggle is a moment-to-moment decision—to learn to open or close one’s mind.

“Look, school is very important. You go to school to learn a skill or profession to become a contributing member of society. Every culture needs teachers, doctors, mechanics, artists, cooks, businesspeople, police officers, firefighters, and soldiers. Schools train them so society can thrive and flourish,” said rich dad. “Unfortunately, for many people school is the end, not the beginning.”

I really did not understand what he was saying that day, but over the years, it made more and more sense.

Regards,

Regards,

Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki,

Editor, Rich Dad Poor Dad Daily

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Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki, author of bestseller Rich Dad Poor Dad as well as 25 others financial guide books, has spent his career working as a financial educator, entrepreneur, successful investor, real estate mogul, and motivational speaker, all while running the Rich Dad Company.

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